Grapefruit Ginger Compote | Nutrition Stripped
Eat Well Aug. 21. 2018
Condiments

Grapefruit Ginger Compote To Put On All The Things

Aug. 21. 2018
Condiments
McKel Hill, MS, RDN, LDN

McKel Hill, MS, RDN, LDN

Dietitian, Founder

Isn’t it great to have a handful of recipes you can use on everything from breakfast to dessert? Try out this grapefruit ginger compote.

This Grapefruit Ginger Compote can be made on the weekend for your meal prep and used from a breakfast topping with porridge to a topping on your favorite coconut milk ice-cream for a little sweet tangy combo. Grapefruits come in several varieties including red, white, and pink — they all taste relatively similar in my opinion, slightly sweet and bitter so you can use whatever grapefruit you have on hand.

The Health Benefits Of Grapefruit To Know About

For starters, let’s get the most popular component of grapefruit out in the open, vitamin C. In just 1/2 (100g) of a grapefruit there’s around 60% daily value for vitamin C. Obviously depending on our individual needs and health, we may need more vitamin C, but for most of us including something like 1/2 – 1 grapefruit a day will cover your vitamin C needs. In addition, think of all the dark leafy greens and other fruits and vegetables you’re eating on the Nutrition Stripped lifestyle, you’re covered with vitamin C!

When you think of lycopene you may think of tomatoes, and yes you’re right, but did you know that pink, orange, and red foods contain this powerful carotenoid phytonutrient? Lycopene, which also contributes to the pinkish color in the fruit, has the highest capacity at fighting free radical damage to cells (1). Eating grapefruit has also been shown to help decrease weight and fat mass in overweight adults and may improve insulin resistance (2)(3).

There’s also a lot of buzz when it comes to weight loss and fat loss and eating grapefruit — do you remember the whole grapefruit diet thing in the 80’s and 90’s? Well while I’m sure you can guess, I’m not a fan of that diet, but there are some studies showing grapefruit may reduce body fat in some individuals when mixed with other compounds such as caffeine, grapefruit polyphenols, and other antioxidants found in the berry family of fruits. In addition to this, grapefruit may also increase metabolic rate (i.e. metabolism!), by working on a cellular level increasing the amount of ATP, which is a fancy way of saying “cellular energy”.

The Other Half Of The G-Team: Ginger

In our article highlighting the best Adaptogens for Natural Stress Relief, we touched on ginger, because it can help calm digestion. Ginger is a root that contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds called gingerols, which have been shown to help fight inflammation with certain cancers such as ovarian and colon cancers, as well as diseases such as arthritis, muscular pain or swelling, and joint pain. It’s been used for thousands of years to treat ailments like colds, nausea, arthritis, migraines, and hypertension. (6) Read more about the studies on ginger and their levels of evidence here. Be sure to search “ginger” here on NS to find all of the many recipes and posts devoted to this powerful adaptogen.

Stripped

Vitamin C

In just 1/2 (100g) of a grapefruit there’s around 60% daily value for vitamin C. Obviously depending on our individual needs and health, we may need more vitamin C, but for most of us including something like 1/2 – 1 grapefruit a day will cover your vitamin C needs.

Lycopene

Grapefruit contains lycopene, which also contributes to the pinkish color in the fruit, has the highest capacity at fighting free radical damage to cells (1).

Weight Maintenance

Grapefruit has also been shown to help decrease weight and fat mass in overweight adults and may improve insulin resistance (2) (3)

Body Fat

Grapefruit may help reduce body fat in some individuals when mixed with other compounds such as caffeine, grapefruit polyphenols, and other antioxidants found in the berry family of fruits (4)

Metabolism

Grapefruit may increase metabolic rate (i.e. metabolism!), by working on a cellular level increases the amount of ATP, which is a fancy way of saying “cellular energy” (5)

Reducing Inflammation

Ginger has been shown to help fight inflammation with certain cancers such as ovarian and colon cancers, as well as diseases such as arthritis, muscular pain or swelling, and joint pain — to reducing symptoms of common ailments like colds, nausea, arthritis, migraines, and hypertension (6)

The Whole Grapefruit-Medication Interaction Thing

Yes, some people who take prescription medications should be extra aware and mindful when incorporating grapefruit into their diets. Grapefruit has a strong interaction with some of the most widely prescribed medications. Why? Grapefruit contains a compound called naringenin that inactivates cytochrome P450 3A4 (a fancy way of saying an enzyme in the small intestine that metabolizes some prescription drugs).

This slows down the normal detoxification and metabolism in the liver and intestines, which makes it harder for the body to eliminate and break down the drug. Not only can grapefruit decrease the function of a drug, but it can also enhance making the drug more potent- both of these side effects are no good when you’re trying to regulate a medical condition with a prescription drug. Best advice is to do your research and ask your physician or dietitian.

The Recipe

Serves 6ish

Print

Ingredients

3 large pink grapefruits

1 tablespoon water

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger

1/2 tablespoon maple syrup

Small pinch of sea salt

Instructions

Step 1

In a small saucepan over medium-low heat, add the peeled and chopped grapefruit and all ingredients. Stir and let cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. The total cook time will depend on how juicy the grapefruits are that you’re using, but the goal is to let them cook long and low heat enough to break down.

Step 2

After the grapefruit has broken down and there’s little remaining liquid in the pot. Take off the heat and let cool for about 20 minutes, it’ll still be warm to serve or for storage.

Step 3

Serve warm with warm breakfast bowls, porridge, on top of pancakes, waffles, or serve chilled with ice cream. I’ve also tried this warm and served on top of cold coconut milk ice cream for a delicious hot/cold combo.

Have Leftovers? Here’s What To Do With Them:

As always, store in an airtight glass container that we recommend from the NS Shop for up to 5 days. Reheat on the stove and add to a warm breakfast, add to a cold breakfast, or keep it chilled and use it with ice cream.

Can’t wait to see you try it!

Did you know that you can submit your own photo of whatever recipe you make from NS? Scroll down to the bottom right and you’ll see a section for you to show off your creations from home!

Can’t wait to see how you make these and share your meal with me! Tag us on Instagram @nutritionstripped #nutritionstripped

References:
  1. Protective effect of lycopene on lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage in cell culture. H. R. Matos, P. Di Mascio, M. H. Medeiros. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2000 Nov 1; 383(1): 56–59.
  2. The effects of daily consumption of grapefruit on body weight, lipids, and blood pressure in healthy, overweight adults. Caitlin A. Dow, Scott B. Going, Hsiao-Hui S. Chow, Bhimanagouda S. Patil, Cynthia A. Thomson. Metabolism. 2012 Jul; 61(7): 1026–1035. Published online 2012 Feb 2. 
  3. The effects of grapefruit on weight and insulin resistance: relationship to the metabolic syndrome. Ken Fujioka, Frank Greenway, Judy Sheard, Yu Ying. J Med Food. 2006 Spring; 9(1): 49–54.
  4. Lipolytic effect of a polyphenolic citrus dry extract of red orange, grapefruit, orange (SINETROL) in human body fat adipocytes. Mechanism of action by inhibition of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE). Constantin Dallas, Alain Gerbi, Guillaume Tenca, Franck Juchaux, François-Xavier Bernard. Phytomedicine. 2008 Oct; 15(10): 783–792. Published online 2008 Jul 9. 
  5. Nootkatone, a characteristic constituent of grapefruit, stimulates energy metabolism and prevents diet-induced obesity by activating AMPK. Takatoshi Murase, Koichi Misawa, Satoshi Haramizu, Yoshihiko Minegishi, Tadashi Hase. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Aug; 299(2): E266–E275. Published online 2010 May 25. 
  6. The Amazing and Mighty Ginger. Bode AM, Dong Z. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011. Chapter 7. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92775/

 

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