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Eat Well Mar. 31. 2015
Entreés

Deconstructed Beet Bourguignon and Pilaf

Mar. 31. 2015
Entreés
McKel Hill

McKel Hill

MS, RDN, LDN, Dietitian

Can I start off by saying, I’m BEYOND EXCITED to share this recipe with you all- it’s so good I can’t take it. Bourguignon (boor-gee-nyawn) is a well known French recipe that was most famously brought to mainstream cooking with Julia Child’s beef bourguignon. With Easter Sunday quickly approaching, many homes around the world will celebrate with some type of hearty roast or stew; I was inspired to make a Nutrition Stripped style homage to Julia Child’s beef Bourguignon sans the beef…and totally deconstructed…and made with beets as the centerpiece. Hearty quartered tri-colored beets on a bed of fluffy millet pilaf with roasted almonds and thyme, smothered with a bourguignon stew reduction, and topped with fresh parsley. The combination is crazy delicious and something completely unexpected when you think of beets and bourguignon. I promise, make this for Easter Sunday or any Sunday roast for that matter, and you’ll have a crowd pleaser.

Bourguignon, baby.

I went to a lovely Food Wine & Design dinner with Nashville Lifestyles last week and was completely inspired by the food, especially a simple starter of tri-colored beets. They were marinated in the most amazing spicy seasoning mix, topped with micro greens, and a reduction- it was the preparation of beets that were so hearty and “meaty” that gave me instant inspiration for this recipe! Beets are incredibly hearty when cooked correctly, in this recipe they’re cooked low and slow for about an hour after the Bourguignon has time to marinate and settle in it’s flavor.

Beets are great to incorporate into our diets for anti-inflammatory and detoxification benefits mainly in Phase 2 detoxification (there are two phases), which involves the enzyme glutathione-s-transferase a.k.a. GST. GST’s basically work to “catch” and “hook up” unwanted toxic substances in our bodies with nutrients- this allows the toxins to become water soluble and neutralized from the nutrients, therefore safe for the body to excrete through your urine or other processes. A note about detoxification: detoxification is a daily practice and a lifelong habit, which I strongly practice and recommend to my clients as well. Detoxification can’t occur simply by doing a “cleanse” for one week- our bodies actually do a tremendous job at detoxifying our bodies through multiple channels if we give them the space, nutrients, proper practices to enhance, and time to do so. Beets are great to provide the body with ample amounts of antioxidants needed, so get your beet on!

 

Traditionally bourguignon is a hearty French recipe made when beef is braised in red wine, beef broth, with garlic, pearl onions, mushrooms, and herbs added to the dish at the end of cooking. It’s rich and has that “stick to your bones” fill factor. I wanted to replicate this hearty and satisfying aspect to bourguignon without using beef and making beets the star ingredient and I have to say, it’s a winner and you truly can’t go wrong when making this. Instead of serving this bourguignon with mashed potatoes or noodles, I opted for a more fiber and protein rich grain since we’re replacing a protein as the main ingredients. If you want to boost this entree with plant-based protein, I find it tastes lovely with cooked lentils, kidney beans, or a sprinkle of hemp seeds in the pilaf. Millet is one of my favorite gluten free grains, as well as quinoa, as it contains minerals, fiber, protein, and is THE perfect little sponge for soaking up all the rich, savory, and thick liquid from this bourguignon. The pilaf is incredibly simple to make and I found it easiest just to make this as soon as I left the bourguignon on the stove for the first hour to cook; you’ll add almonds, fresh parsley, lemon juice, and sea salt to taste and it’s finished.

I highly recommend turning on some tunes (I’ve been loving a band called Snowmine lately), pour some tea, relax and cook- totally being in the moment. This is a recipe you take your time with, the preparation is quite easy, but the cook time is long making it the perfect dish to start in the afternoon so it’ll be ready in time for dinner. When testing this recipe, I made it from start to finish in about 3- 3 1/2 hours, but that’s also with a photo shoot and testing in between!

  

Recipe inspired and adapted by Julia Child’s original, and Green Kitchen Stories played with this concept.

Deconstructed Beet Bourguignon and Pilaf
Recipe Type: supper, main, entree
Author: McKel Hill, MS, RD, LDN
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 6-8+
A vegan and gluten free play on traditional bourguignon made with hearty beets and served on top of millet pilaf. GF VGN
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 sweet onion, sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • 12 ounces (about 1 1/2 cups) pearl onions
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 8-10 large golden, red, and candy cane beets, quartered
  • 2 tablespoons brown rice flour
  • 2 cups red wine
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf, crumbled
  • Herb bouquet with 4 parsley sprigs, 1 bay leaf, one-quarter teaspoon thyme, tied in cheesecloth)
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms, quartered
  • PILAF
  • 1 cup millet
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
Instructions
  1. In a deep pot, heat olive oil on medium-high, add carrots, garlic, sweet onion, sea salt, and black pepper. Saute until onions are soft and slightly brown. Add pearl onions and cook, occasionally flipping them so they brown evenly on each side for about 10 minutes- you don’t want these to get mushy, just brown and holding the firm shape. Add flour, cook for additional 3 minutes. You may want to add an additional tablespoon of olive oil here if it becomes too dry.
  2. Add red wine, vegetable stock, tomato paste, mushrooms, balsamic vinegar, and herbs. Simmer and cook for 1 hour, uncovered. The stew will reduce and thicken.
  3. Next, add in quartered beets and cook for an additional hour or until beets become tender, not mushy, just fork tender.
  4. FOR THE PILAF: Boil 2 cups of water, add the 1 cup of millet, cook on medium uncovered for 20 minutes or until water has absorbed. Fluff the millet with a fork and set aside. Add chopped almonds, fresh parsley, garlic, olive oil, and fresh squeezed lemon.
  5. TO SERVE: There are two serving options, either take a large serving bowl and plate the pilaf on one side and the Beet Bourguignon on the other, when eating just mix the two together. Another option is to plate by scooping the pilaf on the bottom of a plate, followed by placing 2-4 beet quarters on top of the pilaf, then spoon the Beet Bourguignon liquid on top.
  6. Garnish both with fresh thyme and finishing sea salt to taste.
Notes
This makes for a fantastic leftover, store for up to a week. Store pilaf and Beet Bourguignon separately.

I hope you all enjoy this recipe! It’s truly a “stick to your ribs” type of meal; make it with your friends and family this Easter- I know that’s what I’ll be doing 🙂

xx McKel

The Recipe

Serves 6-8+

Print

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 sweet onion, sliced
  • 1 carrot, sliced
  • 12 ounces (about 1 1/2 cups) pearl onions
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 8-10 large golden, red, and candy cane beets, quartered
  • 2 tablespoons brown rice flour
  • 2 cups red wine
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf, crumbled
  • Herb bouquet with 4 parsley sprigs, 1 bay leaf, one-quarter teaspoon thyme, tied in cheesecloth)
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms, quartered
  • PILAF
  • 1 cup millet
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Juice of 2 lemons
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest

Directions:

  1. In a deep pot, heat olive oil on medium-high, add carrots, garlic, sweet onion, sea salt, and black pepper. Saute until onions are soft and slightly brown. Add pearl onions and cook, occasionally flipping them so they brown evenly on each side for about 10 minutes- you don’t want these to get mushy, just brown and holding the firm shape. Add flour, cook for additional 3 minutes. You may want to add an additional tablespoon of olive oil here if it becomes too dry.
  2. Add red wine, vegetable stock, tomato paste, mushrooms, balsamic vinegar, and herbs. Simmer and cook for 1 hour, uncovered. The stew will reduce and thicken.
  3. Next, add in quartered beets and cook for an additional hour or until beets become tender, not mushy, just fork tender.
  4. FOR THE PILAF: Boil 2 cups of water, add the 1 cup of millet, cook on medium uncovered for 20 minutes or until water has absorbed. Fluff the millet with a fork and set aside. Add chopped almonds, fresh parsley, garlic, olive oil, and fresh squeezed lemon.
  5. TO SERVE: There are two serving options, either take a large serving bowl and plate the pilaf on one side and the Beet Bourguignon on the other, when eating just mix the two together. Another option is to plate by scooping the pilaf on the bottom of a plate, followed by placing 2-4 beet quarters on top of the pilaf, then spoon the Beet Bourguignon liquid on top.
  6. Garnish both with fresh thyme and finishing sea salt to taste.

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Share Your Thoughts & Images

  • Interesting recipe! And your amazing photos makes everything more intriguing!

  • So clever! And it looks delicious. I love beets and the fact that they are such good detoxers is just an added bonus….and the millet pilaf sounds good enough all on it’s own.

  • Amy

    When do you add the mushrooms?

  • Rebeca

    Woah, this looks crazy good! It combines several of my favourite things, so I’ll have to make it soon. I’ll report back!

    • Rebeca

      I made it tonight for a dinner with friends – big hit! It even pleased the meat eaters, vegetable averse in the group (I didn’t tell them it was beets until they’d tried it, ha!) Best part? Leftovers only for me!
      Thanks for another killer recipe!

      (BTW, I wanted to give it 5 stars but it wouldn’t let me!)

  • Rachael Thompson

    One of my all time favourite dishes. I’ve made it several times before in my slow cooker. Great to leave cooking on low through day and finish off when I get back from work. Never really followed a direct recipe just made it up on the go with regards to herbs, wine etc. Its lovely with quartered turnips instead of carrots too. Also tried with some red lentils which was nice (I find too many spoils it though and takes away from the beets). I have served it with quinoa, jacket potato and cous cous before and all complimented well.
    I shall definitely try this recipe and with millet. Never had millet before! Thank you so much……x

  • Wow, this looks super delicious! I’ve never had the traditional bourguignon (or any beef at all for that matter), but I must try this. I’ve got some beautiful beets in the fridge right now 🙂

  • Millie

    Made this tonight and I was in heaven. Loved it so much. well worth the time spent. It had so much flavor I felt like I was at a restaurant.

    • Amazing! Thank you so much for sharing- be sure to spread the word more people need to know about this haha!

  • Truly amazing! Thanks for sharing

  • annette

    I’ve never cooked with fresh beets…… do you have to peel them first?

    • No you don’t have to peel them, just wash them really well since most have dirt on them! Hope you enjoy this!

  • Emily

    Hi! Would love to make this, just wondering what to use instead of the two cups of red wine – is there an alternative? Thanks so much!

    • Red wine is a classic ingredient, so I really like to keep it in there. All the alcohol cooks off anyways, it’s just for flavor. If you can’t use it then I would use a very rich vegetable stock!

  • This is the first time i visited this page, and i like your recipes and will try to make them very soon.

  • Looks Yummy !
    Very Interesting Recipie

  • Nadia

    Is there a subsitute for brown rice flour? Thanks, McKel!

    • You can use any flour you have on hand, brown rice is a gluten free staple for me and very affordable. You can use any you have on hand.

  • Nadia

    While on the topic of flour, it’s a good time to ask how to know when you really need the very specifically stated flour as opposed to any other flour… there are just so many to keep up with these days. I make my own almond milk and save the almond meal to make almond flour. I generally use that in place of any flour, but sometimes I wonder if I’m missing out on something because I ad-libbed and just use what I’ve got. Thanks again!

    • You’re not missing out on anything! That’s a great way to utilize the almond pulp from making milk. And you’re right, there are so many flours nowadays!

  • Lauren

    Hello McKel!! First I would like to say what an amazing site you have built!! As a Chef for 21 years and a health coach, reading your site is not only inspiring, and educational I wish I could reach through my computer scream and taste away!! Thank you for sharing all of your knowledge with all of us!! Keep up the fantastic work!!

    So I’m loving the idea of this recipe. I had a quick question. So when adding the tomato paste are you adding and allowing it to cook a few before adding your liquids? Or are we doing as follows per your recipe and adding it with the stock and allowing it to cook this way?

    • Thank you so much, that’s so kind! I typically add in the paste before the stock to let it cook and melt in with the other flavors then follow with stock- BUT if you it at the same time, that works too 😉 xx M